Wednesday, June 12, 2013

Nature and a pair of short films (NSFW)


The prettiest thing on the Internet today is this footage of a supercell thunderstorm forming near Brooker Texas and caught on pixels by photographer Mike Oblinski.


via IO9

If you're in the mood for something artsy, West European, sci-fi, and heavy on symbolism German-based Reynold Reynold's The Secret Machine is worth the view at 14 minutes in length. It plays with time and space and questions whether there is more to existence than that which can be quantified. It's also more about the exploratory journey than reaching its destination. NSFW with nudity, brief sexual imagery, and some potentially disturbing minor surgical images.




The Secret Machine one of three films in the Secrets trilogy. The first, Secret Life covers the viewpoint of the world of plants and is shot using a time-lag method meant to evoke the time scale that slow-moving plants live in, rather than the one that us quick, hot-blooded mammals are familiar with.

An idea that is infinitely fascinating for me is that based on having different senses and brain wiring some organisms experience an ecology and their life within that organic system in a vastly different manner than the other beings around them. For example, a blind mole rat and keen-eyed falcon might live and participate in the same desert ecosystem, but their experience and the way they process it are two largely separate sensory universes.



Secret Life from Artstudio Reynolds on Vimeo.

Other films

It's been more hit than miss recently as far as short science fiction films on the Internet. I keep coming across some beautiful pieces that fall just shy of being good enough to share here. That and there is a glut of dystopian or post-apocalyptic films with minor-tone soundtracks and deliberately sparse or terse dialog.

Dear film students of the world. Yes, science fiction is a genre that lends itself to storytelling that can be powerful, symbolic, evocative, and even frightening. But it's also broad field that covers a lot of the human experience and as well as potential experiences that we or our descendants may one day live through. Please, please, pretty please try to get out of your collective rut and show us some of the terrain outside the one narrow slice you all have fallen into.

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